Reading Friends Reading Group / Dementia Action Week 17th-23rd May 2021 

Botwell Green Library's Reading Friends Reading Group met prior to this week's "Dementia Action Week" to discuss Somebody I Used To Know, the memoir of Alzheimer's Society ambassador and blogger Wendy Mitchell who was diagnosed with young-onset dementia at the age of 58.  Synopsis  Brave, illuminating and inspiring, Somebody I Used to Know is the first memoir ever written by… Continue reading Reading Friends Reading Group / Dementia Action Week 17th-23rd May 2021 

Greek Orthodox Easter Craft

Eastern Christianity recognises a different date for Easter because they follow the Julian calendar, as opposed to the Gregorian calendar which is widely used by most countries today. Great Britain changed to the Gregorian calendar in 1752. The Julian Calendar was proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, in which the year consisted of 365… Continue reading Greek Orthodox Easter Craft

Five picture books to read to your children about space

This Women's History Month, Botwell Green Library have been learning all about the astronaut Mae Jemison, the first ever Black woman to travel to space when she served as a mission specialist on board the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1992. To celebrate Jemison's incredible achievement, Emma and Sarah from Botwell Green Library have compiled this… Continue reading Five picture books to read to your children about space

Two Inspiring Female Scientists You May Not Know About!

To celebrate British Science Week, Munmun and Sarah from Botwell Green Library have been looking into the lives of two women scientists who set records in their scientific fields. Sunita Williams: Indian-American Astronaut Indian-American astronaut Sunita "Suni" L. Williams was selected as an astronaut by NASA in 1998 and is a veteran of two space missions, Expedition 14… Continue reading Two Inspiring Female Scientists You May Not Know About!

LGBT+ History Month – Why should we celebrate?

LGBT+ History Month is an annual celebration that provides education and insight into the issues that the LGBT+ community faces - but why should everyone get involved in celebrating this initiative? Surely, nowadays your sexual orientation, identity or changing your pronouns doesn't matter right? Unfortunately, this is not the case. Although there have been leaps forward in recent years… Continue reading LGBT+ History Month – Why should we celebrate?

Young Adult Fiction & Mental Health

by Brady Clark Young Adult fiction and the subject of mental health go hand in hand. Many writers are finding new stories to tell as stigmas are broken, more about psychological illness is understood and the gateway for a discussion about depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and other conditions is continually widening. More than this, writers… Continue reading Young Adult Fiction & Mental Health

Quarantine blues? Why reading John Steinbeck novels could help get you through the pandemic.

Guest post by Benjamin Kirby from Brunel University While a return to normalcy is an unclear destination— our daily lives reduced to eat-binge-sleep-repeat— the pressures and claustrophobia of isolation can be an overbearing sensation to many of us. The heatwave has proved to be another weight we did not need to carry as we are… Continue reading Quarantine blues? Why reading John Steinbeck novels could help get you through the pandemic.

Being Black, Beautiful and Brave: Your Next Fantasy Adventure

A review by Bijal Patel Children of Blood and Bone is Tomi Adeyemi’s first published novel, winning the Instant New York Times Bestseller, Amazon.com Best Books of the Year and Goodreads Choice awards. The story follows a magical journey embarked on by spirited and determined Zélie, who lives in Ilorin, Nigeria. Zélie decides enough is… Continue reading Being Black, Beautiful and Brave: Your Next Fantasy Adventure

“A story is a tightrope between worlds”

Women and historiographic metafiction by Charlotte Dingle The term “historiographic metafiction” was first used by the Canadian literary theorist Linda Hutcheon in her book A Poetics of Postmodernism. She describes works of historiographic metafiction as "those well-known and popular novels which are both intensely self-reflexive and yet paradoxically also lay claim to historical events and… Continue reading “A story is a tightrope between worlds”